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Bexsero Vaccine Shields, Teenagers Infants from Meningitis B

Inoculating infants with the Bexsero vaccine against group B meningitis provides safety from the lethal infection for at least two years in 75% of young kids, in response to outcomes from the first massive real-word test of the vaccine, carried out in the U.K.

In the meantime, an Australian study is exhibiting that while the vaccine further works in teenagers, it doesn’t extend “herd immunity” to unvaccinated children, as some vaccines do.

Meningitis “is one of the fastest, most wicked infections out there. The kid might be sneezing in the morning and be dead at night, even if they get to the hospital,” stated Dr. Shamez Ladhani, a clinical epidemiologist at Public Health England.

Even with medicines, 10% to 15% of patients die, and as much as 19% of survivors have long-term incapacities. Group B bacteria cause about one-third of instances of meningococcal disease in the U.S.

 The UK research, based on the first three years of that program, offers critical new details about the effectiveness of the vaccine (4CMemB), which is offered by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK).

There have been 63 cases of meningitis B after the vaccination program compared with 253 cases that had been anticipated during that interval, following on earlier rates.

That interprets right into a 75% reduction in disease amongst children who had been absolutely eligible for vaccination.

Ladhani stated he hoped the new findings, together with outcomes of other assessments anticipated from researchers in Portugal and Italy, will encourage other nations to provoke population-wide vaccination applications for the toddlers and teenagers age 15 – the two groups most vulnerable to meningitis.

nnoculating infants with the Bexsero vaccine against group B meningitis provides protection from the deadly infection for at least two years in 75% of young children, according to results from the first large real-word test of the vaccine, conducted in the United Kingdom.

Meanwhile, an Australian study is showing that while the vaccine also works in teens, it does not extend “herd immunity” to unvaccinated children, as some vaccines do.

Meningitis “is one of the fastest, most vicious infections you can have. The child can be sneezing in the morning and be dead in the evening, even if they get to the hospital,” said Dr. Shamez Ladhani, a clinical epidemiologist at Public Health England and a coauthor of both papers.

Even with antibiotics, 10% to 15% of patients die and up to 19% of survivors have long-term disabilities. About one third of cases of meningococcal disease in the United States are caused by group B bacteria.

The UK study, based on the first three years of that program, provides important new information about the effectiveness of the vaccine, which is sold by GlaxoSmithKline and also known as 4CMemB.

There were 63 cases of meningitis B after the vaccination program compared with 253 cases that were expected during that period, based on previous rates.

That translates into a 75% reduction in disease among children who were fully eligible for vaccination.

Ladhani said he hoped the new findings, along with results of other tests expected from researchers in Portugal and Italy, will encourage other countries to initiate population-wide vaccination programs for the very young and teenagers beginning around age 15, the two groups most prone to meningitis.

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